BLACK CONSCIOUSNESS – OUR GUIDING LIGHT (an extract from the Minimum Programme)

Born 16 March 1993, privileged to learn about The Black Consciousness philosophy in South Africa A MUST READ!!! The Black Consciousness (BC) philosophy in South Africa was born from the realisation that “the most potent weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed”. Introduced by the South African Students Organisation (SASO) to the South African political landscape, with Steve Biko as its leading theorist and communicator, BC sought to eliminate the alienation – from self that afflicted the being of the oppressed Black people of South Africa. It sought to free the mind of the … Continue reading BLACK CONSCIOUSNESS – OUR GUIDING
LIGHT
(an extract from the Minimum Programme)

Thank You

Heather Matarazzo *Originally this piece was a lot angrier. I called people out, and it felt good, but then I realized that this is not the kind of person I desire to be. I’ve spent quite a bit of time recently being angry. Theres a lot to be angry about, but sometimes it can cause one’s soul to atrophy into a dark mass of negativity, and that’s not what I want for myself. It’s hard to stay positive in this business — hell, its hard staying positive as a human being, with the state of the world right now — … Continue reading Thank You

The history of South Africa

The history of South Africa is characterised by racial violence, territorial conflict, wars of conquest, and inter-ethnic rivalry. The aboriginal Khoi and San lived in the region for millennia. Most of the rest of the population trace their history to later immigration. Africans (also referred to as Bantu ) in South Africa are descendants of immigrants from central Africa, who first entered what are now the confines of the country roughly 2000 years ago. White South Africans are descendants of later European settlers, mainly from the Netherlands, Germany, France and Britain. The large population of Coloureds, as they were officially … Continue reading The history of South Africa

The Charleston Shooting and the Potent Symbol of the Black Church in America

Originally posted on The Junto:
Last night, Dylann Storm Roof entered the historic Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in downtown Charleston, South Carolina, sat through an hour-long meeting, and then opened fire on those in attendance. Reverend Clementa Pinckney, a state senator, was among nine individuals who were killed. Many are shocked at not only the grisly nature of the shooting, but also its location. “There is no greater coward,” Cornell William Brooks, president of the N.A.A.C.P, declared in a statement, “than a criminal who enters a house of God and slaughters innocent people engaged in the study of scripture.”… Continue reading The Charleston Shooting and the Potent Symbol of the Black Church in America